Guests in My Corn

thethirdshift:

brevetcaptain:

Local Second Amendment Hero.

Read the headline and thought “Florida or Ohio?”

HAH! Not my Columbus, this time

bendawson:

brevetcaptain:

somekidsmom:

stars-in-the-woods:


 This Map Shows The Best Sandwich From Every State

Now all I can think about is a hot pressed sandwich. Like a cornbeef Reuben! I think I’m hungry.

I was born and raised in Alabama and I have never even seen a chicken sandwich with white BBQ sauce. If this is our best sandwich I think I’d have encountered one in the past 45 years.

Fluffernutter? F THAT.
Harrison’s Roast Beef from North Andover is correct.

The Jucy Lucy is the correct answer. It’s not even close.

The Polish Boy is also the correct choice for Ohio

bendawson:

brevetcaptain:

somekidsmom:

stars-in-the-woods:

 This Map Shows The Best Sandwich From Every State

Now all I can think about is a hot pressed sandwich. Like a cornbeef Reuben! I think I’m hungry.

I was born and raised in Alabama and I have never even seen a chicken sandwich with white BBQ sauce. If this is our best sandwich I think I’d have encountered one in the past 45 years.

Fluffernutter? F THAT.

Harrison’s Roast Beef from North Andover is correct.

The Jucy Lucy is the correct answer. It’s not even close.

The Polish Boy is also the correct choice for Ohio

The Lord created us in His image and likeness, and we are the image of the Lord, and He does good and all of us have this commandment at heart: Do good and do not do evil. All of us. ‘But, Father, this is not Catholic! He cannot do good.’ Yes, he can. He must. Not can: must! Because he has this commandment within him. Instead, this ‘closing off’ that imagines that those outside, everyone, cannot do good is a wall that leads to war and also to what some people throughout history have conceived of: killing in the name of God. That we can kill in the name of God. And that, simply, is blasphemy. To say that you can kill in the name of God is blasphemy.

The Lord has redeemed all of us, all of us, with the Blood of Christ: all of us, not just Catholics. Everyone! ‘Father, the atheists?’ Even the atheists. Everyone! And this Blood makes us children of God of the first class! We are created children in the likeness of God and the Blood of Christ has redeemed us all! And we all have a duty to do good. And this commandment for everyone to do good, I think, is a beautiful path towards peace. If we, each doing our own part, if we do good to others, if we meet there, doing good, and we go slowly, gently, little by little, we will make that culture of encounter: we need that so much. We must meet one another doing good. ‘But I don’t believe, Father, I am an atheist!’ But do good: We will meet one another there.

From Pope Francis’ sermon at Mass on May 22.

I realize that my church is archaic, insular, misogynistic, homophobic and a million other things, and the people who know me know that I’m just as outraged and frustrated by that as any sensible non-Catholic would be. And yet, when I read stuff like this — the worldwide head of the Catholic Church, daring to suggest that people who don’t believe the same stuff that we do can still be loving, moral people — it gives me a glimmer of hope that all is not lost.

Please, please, people, more stuff like this, and less stuff like this.

(via jennyslater)

Important and insightful, from both Pope Francis and Doug.

The mathematician’s patterns, like the painter’s or the poet’s, must be beautiful, the ideas, like the colors or the words, must fit together in a harmonious way. Beauty is the first test; there is no permanent place in the world for ugly mathematics… It may be very hard to define mathematical beauty, but that is just as true of beauty of any kind—we may not know quite what we mean by a beautiful poem, but that does not prevent us from recognizing one when we read it.
G. H. Hardy(A Mathematician’s Apology)
dennymayo:

theatlantic:

Should Science Majors Pay Less for College Than Art Majors?

Down in Florida, a task force commissioned by Governor Rick Scott is putting the finishing touches on a proposal that would allow the state’s public universities to start charging undergraduates different tuition rates depending on their major. Students would get discounts for studying topics thought to be in high demand among Florida employers. Those would likely include science, technology, engineering, and math (aka, the STEM fields), among others. 
But Art History? Gender Studies? Classics? Sorry, but the fates are cruel. Unless a university could show that local companies were clamoring to hire humanities students, those undergrads would have to pay more for their diploma. 

Read more. [Image: Edudemic]

No.

This is ridiculously dumb. Colleges aren’t employment factories, they’re institutions of higher learning.

dennymayo:

theatlantic:

Should Science Majors Pay Less for College Than Art Majors?

Down in Florida, a task force commissioned by Governor Rick Scott is putting the finishing touches on a proposal that would allow the state’s public universities to start charging undergraduates different tuition rates depending on their major. Students would get discounts for studying topics thought to be in high demand among Florida employers. Those would likely include science, technology, engineering, and math (aka, the STEM fields), among others. 

But Art History? Gender Studies? Classics? Sorry, but the fates are cruel. Unless a university could show that local companies were clamoring to hire humanities students, those undergrads would have to pay more for their diploma. 

Read more. [Image: Edudemic]

No.

This is ridiculously dumb. Colleges aren’t employment factories, they’re institutions of higher learning.

This is the kind of stuff that I like to spend time thinking about. I know I’m weird, but I’m OK with it. This is some cool ish, and if it doesn’t mess with your head a bit, you’re not thinking hard enough.

isomorphismes:

Just playing with z² / z² + 2z + 2

g(z)=\frac{z^2}{z^2+2z+2}

on WolframAlpha. That’s Wikipedia’s example of a function with two poles (= two singularities = two infinities). Notice how “boring” line-only pictures are compared to the the 3-D ℂ→>ℝ picture of the mapping (the one with the poles=holes). That’s why mathematicians say ℂ uncovers more of “what’s really going on”.

As opposed to normal differentiability, ℂ-differentiability of a function implies:

  • infinite descent into derivatives is possible (no chain of C¹ ⊂ C² ⊂ C³ ... Cω like usual)

  • nice Green’s-theorem type shortcuts make many, many ways of doing something equivalent. (So you can take a complicated real-world situation and validly do easy computations to understand it, because a squibbledy path computes the same as a straight path.)
  

Pretty interesting to just change things around and see how the parts work.

  • The roots of the denominator are 1+i and 1−i (of course the conjugate of a root is always a root since i and −i are indistinguishable)
  • you can see how the denominator twists
  • a fraction in ℂ space maps lines to circles, because lines and circles are turned inside out (they are just flips of each other: see also projective geometry)
  • if you change the z^2/ to a z/ or a 1/ you can see that.
  • then the Wikipedia picture shows the poles (infinities) 

Complex ℂ→ℂ maps can be split into four parts: the input “real”⊎”imaginary”, and the output “real“⊎”imaginary”. Of course splitting them up like that hides the holistic truth of what’s going on, which comes from the perspective of a “twisted” plane where the elements z are mod z • exp(i • arg z).

a conformal map (angle-preserving map)

ℂ→ℂ mappings mess with my head…and I like it.

It takes ~20 observations to verify your first significant digit of the mean with confidence.

Do you know how many observations it takes to verify your first sig-fig of the variance? More like 1000. And that’s just to get one digit of accuracy! Higher moments (skew, kurtosis) are even worse.

That’s why I often laugh out loud when I read in the newspaper claims that rely on a certain value of the variance. Even in serious, published papers!—I often see tables with estimates of standard deviation that go out to three decimal places, just because the software spat the numbers out that way. It gives a false sense of accuracy. It’s ridiculous.
Karen Kafadar (via isomorphismes)
Why yes, I will spend the rest of the weekend day-dreaming about a Levon Helm/MCA collaboration…

I just can’t help it.

thethirdshift:

truth. now get on your bikes and ride.

"Ooooooohhhh, won’t you take me home tonight?" Rock on forever, Freddie!

thethirdshift:

truth. now get on your bikes and ride.

"Ooooooohhhh, won’t you take me home tonight?" Rock on forever, Freddie!